“They All Fall Down”

“They All Fall Down” by Rachel Howzell Hall pays homage to the Agatha Christie classic “And Then There Were None.” This variation starts with a group of reality show contestants heading to a remote island off the coast of Mexico. All have visions of completing in challenges, making alliances, and mostly, winning the million dollar prize. The contestants quickly learn that there is no contest, and that they are there for another reason. Readers know it will not go well.

The story is told as a first person narrative by Miriam Macy. She talks to readers and talks to herself, planning moves, justifying past actions, and agonizing over her current situation. She despairs events in terms of her own inconvenience, and not only does not make friends, but also develops enemies among the island’s inhabitants. At first readers feel a little sorry for Miriam, and her, but as the body count of her fellow companions rises, she becomes more annoying, and it is tempting to hope that she will be the next victim.

The characters have complex backstories that qualified them for the invitation to the island, and they are all equally unpleasant and disagreeable. Readers are not sad to see any of then killed, and eagerly anticipate who will be the next victim. “And Then There Were None,” is one of Christie’s most adapted stories, some great, some mediocre.

“And Then There Were None,” is one of Christie’s most adapted stories, some great, some mediocre. The premise of a reality competition makes this version current and fascinating. Little details of the remote island, the luxurious mansion, and even the “game pieces” create interest and reinforce the drama. It is hard to follow in Christie’s footprints, but Rachel Howzell Hall created an enjoyable and interesting adaptation.